Pregnancy, Baby and Childcare - Ask the Sister

03rd November, 2015
By Lizeth Kruger

Every pregnancy, baby and child is unique. If you need more information about any of these topics, speak to your Dis‑Chem Sister. We regret that not all questions can be answered/printed. If you need Lizeth’s advice about your child or pregnancy, email careline@dischem.co.za
 

What Is The Best Way To Treat Sunburn In A Toddler?

To treat red, warm skin and pain caused by sunburn:

  • Let your child take a cool bath or shower. Applying cool compresses, as well as soothing creams (look out for child-friendly options from the BioNike range) can also ease the discomfort.
  • Pain medication can be helpful too, but speak to your Dis‑Chem pharmacist for advice.
  • Most importantly, ensure that your child stays well hydrated for the next couple of days. In fact, it’s a good idea to increase their fluid intake.

Sunburn is usually not serious, but if your child has fever or chills, and a headache, is confused, dizzy and vomiting or nauseous, speak to your doctor.

Every pregnancy, baby and child is unique. If you need more information about any of these topics, speak to your Dis‑Chem Sister. We regret that not all questions can be answered/printed. If you need Lizeth’s advice about your child or pregnancy, email lizeth.kruger@dischem.co.za

How Will I Know I’m In Labour? When My Water Breaks?

Every woman experiences labour differently, but there are some early signs that indicate that your baby is getting ready to meet you and the world. Water breaking is just one of them and in many cases, it may not even happen spontaneously. Others include:

  • Passing the gelatinous plug that blocks the cervix; it’s called show and may be passed in one ‘blob’ or in pieces.
  • Abdominal pain that starts in the front and moves to your back; you’ll be aware of a ‘pulling’ sensation in the back.
  • Braxton Hicks contractions are sporadic uterine contractions that happen during pregnancy, and are essentially painless, but contractions signalling labour will be painful and accompanied by downward pressure.
  • You may feel like you’ll have a bowel movement because of the pressure.

Could You Please Share Some Tips To Deal With Reflux In A Three-month-old?

Reflux in infants is common. Complex mechanisms in baby’s oesophagus are still developing, they lie down most of the time and their diets are liquid – all of which are contributing factors. The best tip is to speak to your Dis‑Chem sister for tailor-made advice, but here are some general suggestions:

  • Burp your baby regularly during feeding.
  • Don’t overfeed; try smaller, more frequent feeds instead.
  • Hold baby upright during and immediately after feeding.
  • Make sure that the teat is the right size to prevent milk from coming out too fast.
  • Take it slow – feeding too quickly can contribute to reflux.
If reflux becomes a frequent occurrence, seems painful and causes baby distress, make an appointment with your doctor. The same applies if you notice these symptoms: trouble swallowing, regular projectile vomiting, wheezing or other breathing difficulties, arching back or drawing up legs after feeding, and poor weight gain. In rare cases, it can be the result of a condition such as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD).

 Lizeth Kruger, Dis‑Chem Clinic Manager, answers your pregnancy, baby and childcare questions. Email her at careline@dischem.co.za

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